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|title=Facce Nuove: Boards of Canada
 
|title=Facce Nuove: Boards of Canada
 
|author= Gian Paolo Giabini
 
|author= Gian Paolo Giabini
|date=1999/05
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|date=1999-05
 
|publication=Rumore
 
|publication=Rumore
|issue=88
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|issue=No.88
 
|pages=p.11
 
|pages=p.11
 
}}
 
}}
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__TOC__
 
__TOC__
  
== Original Text ==
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== Text ==
 
<onlyinclude>
 
<onlyinclude>
[[Facce Nuove: Boards of Canada]] was an interview (in Italian) by Gian Paolo Giabini originally published May 1999 in Rumore magazine Number 88 p.11.
 
{{original}}
 
</onlyinclude>
 
 
 
=== Facce Nuove: Boards of Canada ===
 
=== Facce Nuove: Boards of Canada ===
  
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== Translated text  ==
 
== Translated text  ==
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<onlyinclude>
 
<onlyinclude>
{{translation-needed}}
 
 
ROUGH TRANSLATION:
 
 
===New faces: Boards of Canada===
 
===New faces: Boards of Canada===
 
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ROUGH TRANSLATION
 
{{boc|Every so often we rummage through old tapes and if we discover a melody that makes us feel something, that makes us nostalgic, we rework it. It's one of the most important aspects of Boards Of Canada's music, because for us music must be introspective. It must carry within itself something bitter, thoughtful. It must give emotion.}} So '''Michael Sandison''' summarizes what is the philosophy of Boards Of Canada, an English duo that last year, with Music Has The Right To Children and more recently with Peel Sessions, was one of the most interesting surprises within that ever less visible, increasingly "intelligent" ambient scene. The secret to their "success"? A music that, as often happens in the territories haunted by Warp (for which they influence) and Rephlex (the label of Aphex Twin), is playful, ludic and at the same time genetically melancholic, made of simple piano melodies looped and then embedded between them according to a mathematical consequential criterion. A music that is a flow of elaborate and often "distorted" rhythms in the Aphex Twin manner, but above all, inside the evolution of the sound, everything flows tenderly, according to a new "intimist" attitude that dyes with soft colors the music of Music Has The Right Io Children, letting everything be filtered by a desire to thrill and be moved and magically going beyond the logic of the dance floor. It could not have existed otherwise. Just know where Micheal and Marcus (Eoin) arrive to understand this unusual positioning. In fact, in 1992, after having been part of several projects, they started to play regularly on their own, during an evening (Redmoon) that takes place every month, among the ruins of a monastery, in Scotland, a thousand miles away from the roar of dance floor. Three years later, in '95, they formed a studio in a bunker in the Pentland Hills, Scotland, where the first pieces of Music Has The Right To Children were born. Apart from this physical isolationism BOC confirm their distance from "dance" with a "modus operandi" that says a lot about the propensity towards melancholic atmospheres and harmonics that have nothing to do with the physicality of a big-beat and hedonistic chemical generation.
 
{{boc|Every so often we rummage through old tapes and if we discover a melody that makes us feel something, that makes us nostalgic, we rework it. It's one of the most important aspects of Boards Of Canada's music, because for us music must be introspective. It must carry within itself something bitter, thoughtful. It must give emotion.}} So '''Michael Sandison''' summarizes what is the philosophy of Boards Of Canada, an English duo that last year, with Music Has The Right To Children and more recently with Peel Sessions, was one of the most interesting surprises within that ever less visible, increasingly "intelligent" ambient scene. The secret to their "success"? A music that, as often happens in the territories haunted by Warp (for which they influence) and Rephlex (the label of Aphex Twin), is playful, ludic and at the same time genetically melancholic, made of simple piano melodies looped and then embedded between them according to a mathematical consequential criterion. A music that is a flow of elaborate and often "distorted" rhythms in the Aphex Twin manner, but above all, inside the evolution of the sound, everything flows tenderly, according to a new "intimist" attitude that dyes with soft colors the music of Music Has The Right Io Children, letting everything be filtered by a desire to thrill and be moved and magically going beyond the logic of the dance floor. It could not have existed otherwise. Just know where Micheal and Marcus (Eoin) arrive to understand this unusual positioning. In fact, in 1992, after having been part of several projects, they started to play regularly on their own, during an evening (Redmoon) that takes place every month, among the ruins of a monastery, in Scotland, a thousand miles away from the roar of dance floor. Three years later, in '95, they formed a studio in a bunker in the Pentland Hills, Scotland, where the first pieces of Music Has The Right To Children were born. Apart from this physical isolationism BOC confirm their distance from "dance" with a "modus operandi" that says a lot about the propensity towards melancholic atmospheres and harmonics that have nothing to do with the physicality of a big-beat and hedonistic chemical generation.
 
{{boc|Paradoxically, most of the time we spend working on rhythms.}} says '''Michael'''. {{boc|It is a technical precision with which we try to create dirty and "old" sounds that are close to 70s records. This is why we spend hours and hours playing the rhythm or melody ourselves and then "degrade" it. Finally, once this is done, let's move on to the melodies. We record hundreds of incomplete micromelodies. Then we make a selection. We choose the ones we like best and we build the pieces around them, always keeping a concept in mind; to mentally filter the music, trying to hear sinister sounds, in which there is always something nostalgic, melancholic.}}
 
{{boc|Paradoxically, most of the time we spend working on rhythms.}} says '''Michael'''. {{boc|It is a technical precision with which we try to create dirty and "old" sounds that are close to 70s records. This is why we spend hours and hours playing the rhythm or melody ourselves and then "degrade" it. Finally, once this is done, let's move on to the melodies. We record hundreds of incomplete micromelodies. Then we make a selection. We choose the ones we like best and we build the pieces around them, always keeping a concept in mind; to mentally filter the music, trying to hear sinister sounds, in which there is always something nostalgic, melancholic.}}
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== Scans  ==
 
== Scans  ==
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{{scan-needed}}
  
 
<gallery>
 
<gallery>
Image:1999 05 Rumore No88 Cover.jpg
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Image:1999 05 Rumore No88 pg11.jpg
 
 
</gallery>
 
</gallery>
  

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